Non-African Poetry- "Bisney Poplar" by G.M HOPKINS - SS2 Literature Past Questions & Answers - page 1

1

What is the primary theme of "Binsey Poplars"?
   

A

Love and romance
 

B

Nature and environmental destruction
 

C

Religious faith
   

D

Political activism

CORRECT OPTION: b
2

 What is the poet's attitude toward the poplar trees in the poem?
  

A

Joyful
   b)

   **Answer: c) Lamenting their loss**

B

Indifferent
   

C

Lamenting their loss

D

Annoyed

CORRECT OPTION: c
3

What is the poetic style used by Gerard Manley Hopkins in this poem?
  

A

Blank verse
   

  

B

Free verse

C

Sonnet

D

Sprung rhythm

CORRECT OPTION: d
4

Discuss the theme of nature and environmental destruction in "Binsey Poplars." How does the poet convey his concern about the impact of human actions on the natural world? Use specific examples from the poem to support your analysis.

In "Binsey Poplars," Gerard Manley Hopkins laments the destruction of poplar trees and expresses his deep concern about the impact of human actions on the environment. He uses vivid imagery to describe the felling of the trees and highlights the irreversible damage caused by these actions. The poet's use of the phrase "felled, felled, are all felled" underscores the extent of destruction. Moreover, Hopkins' refrain "O if we but knew what we do" reflects his belief that people are often unaware of the consequences of their actions on the natural world. This theme of environmental destruction serves as a warning to readers about the importance of preserving nature.

5

Explore the use of poetic devices and techniques in "Binsey Poplars." How does Gerard Manley Hopkins employ elements such as sprung rhythm, alliteration, and enjambment to enhance the poem's impact and musicality?

Gerard Manley Hopkins employs a unique and distinctive style in "Binsey Poplars" that includes the use of sprung rhythm, alliteration, and enjambment to create a musical and impactful poem. Sprung rhythm, characterized by irregular stressed syllables, adds a sense of surprise and vitality to the verses. The repetition of the word "felled" with its abrupt, monosyllabic sound in the first stanza accentuates the finality of the trees' destruction. Additionally, alliteration and assonance, as seen in lines like "swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim," contribute to the poem's musical quality. Enjambment, where lines flow into each other without punctuation, creates a continuous and flowing rhythm, enhancing the overall aesthetic appeal of the poem. These techniques serve to make the poem not only a lament for the loss of nature but also a beautiful and musical piece of art.

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