Non-African Prose-Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte - SS2 Literature Past Questions & Answers - page 1

1

Analyze the character of Heathcliff in "Wuthering Heights." Discuss his transformation from an orphaned child to a vengeful and brooding figure, and how his character embodies the novel's themes of love and revenge.

Heathcliff is a complex and enigmatic character in "Wuthering Heights." Initially an orphaned child, he is brought to Wuthering Heights and grows up alongside Catherine Earnshaw. His character undergoes a transformation from a passionate and deeply in love young man to a vengeful and brooding figure. His desire for revenge against those who wronged him, especially the Earnshaws and the Lintons, shapes the entire novel. Heathcliff's character embodies the themes of love and revenge, illustrating how unchecked love can turn into a destructive force when fueled by hatred and vengeance.

2

Explore the theme of love and its destructive nature in "Wuthering Heights." Discuss the passionate love between Heathcliff and Catherine and its consequences for the characters and the plot.

Love is a central theme in "Wuthering Heights," particularly the passionate and destructive love between Heathcliff and Catherine. Their love drives much of the plot, yet it also leads to tragedy and revenge. Catherine's choice to marry Edgar Linton sets off a chain of events that ultimately destroys lives. The novel explores how love, when unchecked and consumed by obsession, can have devastating consequences, impacting not only Heathcliff and Catherine but also those around them.

3

What is the central theme of "Wuthering Heights" by Emily Brontë?
  

 

A

Romantic Comedy
 

B

Love and Revenge
   

C

Political Intrigue
   

D

Exploration and Adventure

CORRECT OPTION: b
4

Who is the primary narrator of the novel "Wuthering Heights"?
   

A

Heathcliff
   

B

Catherine Earnshaw
 

C

Edgar Linton
   

D

Nelly Dean

CORRECT OPTION: d
5

Which character represents the destructive power of unchecked emotions and revenge in the novel?
  

 

A

Edgar Linton

B

Catherine Earnshaw
   

C

Heathcliff
   

D

Nelly Dean

CORRECT OPTION: c
6

Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of non-African poetry?

A

It is often written in a different language than the poet's native tongue. 

B

It often explores themes of love, loss, and identity. 

C

It is often influenced by the poet's culture and heritage. 

D

It is always written in a traditional poetic form.

CORRECT OPTION: d
7

Which of the following is NOT a major theme in "Wuthering Heights"?

A

Revenge

B

Love 

C

Class conflict

D

Acceptance 

CORRECT OPTION: d
8

Which of the following is a characteristic of Emily Brontë's writing style in "Wuthering Heights"?

A

She uses vivid imagery and symbolism.

B

She writes in a complex and challenging style.

C

She explores the dark side of human nature.

D

All of the above

CORRECT OPTION: d
9

How does "Wuthering Heights" differ from most African prose?

A

(a) It is set in England, not Africa. 

B

It is written in a traditional European style. 

C

It does not explore African themes.

D

All of the above

CORRECT OPTION: d
10

Discuss the role of revenge in "Wuthering Heights."

Role of revenge in "Wuthering Heights"

Revenge is a central theme in Emily Brontë's novel "Wuthering Heights." It is the driving force behind many of the characters' actions, and it leads to a cycle of violence and destruction. The novel begins with Heathcliff, a young orphan, being mistreated by his new guardian, Hindley Earnshaw. Heathcliff vows revenge against Hindley and his sister, Catherine, who he loves. After Catherine marries Edgar Linton, a wealthy neighbor, Heathcliff spends the next two decades planning his revenge. Heathcliff's revenge is systematic and ruthless. He schemes to gain control of Wuthering Heights and Thrushcross Grange, the two houses that Catherine loved. He also sets out to destroy the happiness of Hindley and Edgar's families. Heathcliff's revenge is ultimately successful, but it brings him no lasting satisfaction. He is left alone and empty, consumed by his hatred.

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