2015 - WAEC Literature Past Questions & Answers - page 1

1
UNSEEN PROSE AND POETRY

Read the passage and the question

A modest two-room hut built of mud and roofed with straw graciously sheltered the Mensahs. One of the rooms advertised itself as a living room. The kind earthenware pot willingly kept company with four ever-smilling stools. The pot eternally contained cool water for guests. The second room was a warm-hearted bedroom without a bed. The poor pair had to sleep on bare straw mats on the polished dirt floor Some overwashed rags deputised for blankets and sheets and pillows. Two strong dry logs, facing each other like bitter rivals burned themselve out at night, not merly to keep the couple warm but mainly to ward off hungry mosquitoes and other hostile pests.
There was no door to ward off the cold night air. Some rude devices, however, were contrived to keep the room quite safe from prying eyes and curious domestic animals. Would any thief be ever tempted to peep into such a rude room of such a poor pair?

The expression 'such a rude room of such a poor pair' illustrates
A
onomatopoeia
B
pun
C
rhyme
D
alliteration
CORRECT OPTION: d
2
UNSEEN PROSE AND POETRY

Read the passage and the question

A modest two-room hut built of mud and roofed with straw graciously sheltered the Mensahs. One of the rooms advertised itself as a living room. The kind earthenware pot willingly kept company with four ever-smilling stools. The pot eternally contained cool water for guests. The second room was a warm-hearted bedroom without a bed. The poor pair had to sleep on bare straw mats on the polished dirt floor Some overwashed rags deputised for blankets and sheets and pillows. Two strong dry logs, facing each other like bitter rivals burned themselve out at night, not merly to keep the couple warm but mainly to ward off hungry mosquitoes and other hostile pests.
There was no door to ward off the cold night air. Some rude devices, however, were contrived to keep the room quite safe from prying eyes and curious domestic animals. Would any thief be ever tempted to peep into such a rude room of such a poor pair?

The setting is
A
dawn
B
sunset
C
midday
D
night
CORRECT OPTION: d
3
Read the poem and answer the question

Proud mothers of the coming age,
'Tis good to find you now engage
Your minds and time your lives to raise
Above the level of bygone days.

'Tis good to see you play your part
With spirit and undaunted heart,
It gives young Afric's throbbing soul
A glimpse of a bright and glorious goals.

God bless you, mothers of our race,
God cause to shine on you His face;
And give you strength and all you crave
To bring forth sons and daughters brave

The rhyme scheme is
A
aabb ccdd eeff
B
abab abab aabb
C
abca abbc abab
D
abba abca abab
CORRECT OPTION: a
4
Read the poem and answer the question

Proud mothers of the coming age,
'Tis good to find you now engage
Your minds and time your lives to raise
Above the level of bygone days.

'Tis good to see you play your part
With spirit and undaunted heart,
It gives young Afric's throbbing soul
A glimpse of a bright and glorious goals.

God bless you, mothers of our race,
God cause to shine on you His face;
And give you strength and all you crave
To bring forth sons and daughters brave

The theme of the poem is
A
the love of mother
B
invoking the spirit of womanhood
C
admiration for women's hard work
D
the suffering of women
CORRECT OPTION: c
5
Read the poem and answer the question

Proud mothers of the coming age,
'Tis good to find you now engage
Your minds and time your lives to raise
Above the level of bygone days.

'Tis good to see you play your part
With spirit and undaunted heart,
It gives young Afric's throbbing soul
A glimpse of a bright and glorious goals.

God bless you, mothers of our race,
God cause to shine on you His face;
And give you strength and all you crave
To bring forth sons and daughters brave

The literary device used in line 7 is
A
conceit
B
personification
C
hyperbole
D
pathos
CORRECT OPTION: c
6
A speech in a play in which a character speaks his or her thoughts alone is
A
a monologue
B
an aside
C
an epilogue
D
a soliloquy
CORRECT OPTION: d
7
In literature, repetition is used essentially for
A
rhyme
B
suspense
C
allusion
D
emphasis
CORRECT OPTION: d
8
The pattern of a poem without reference to its content is referred to as the
A
limerick
B
metre
C
free verse
D
form
CORRECT OPTION: d
9
The performers in a play constitute the
A
chorus
B
characters
C
audience
D
east
CORRECT OPTION: d
10
Read the stanza and the question
Pan, O great Pan, to thee
Thus do we sing!
Thou who keep'st chaste and free
As the young spring:
Ever be thy honour spake
From that place the more is broke
To the place day doth unyoke

The stanza is an example of
A
appellation
B
apostrophe
C
euphemism
D
elegy
CORRECT OPTION: b
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